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Information sur Þjórsárdalur

Type
Waterfalls, Valleys, Rivers, Cultural attractions, Forests
Destination
Rif, Iceland
Distance du centre
28.9 km
Haute saison
Summer
Conviviale et familiale
Yes
Note moyenne
4.9
Nombre d'avis
66

Haifoss is a waterfall in Þjórsárdalur valley.

Þjórsárdalur is a valley in the Southern Highlands of Iceland, with many beautiful features in its vicinity. 

Visit the region on a tour of the Icelandic Highlands.

Natural sites within Þjórsárdalur

Þjórsárdalur runs along the river Þjórsá, Iceland’s longest river. Where a tributary of this river, the Fossá, tumbles into the valley, it creates the magnificent waterfall Háifoss.

Háifoss is one of the tallest waterfalls in the country. It falls dramatically from a height of 122 metres (400 feet) with enormous power, shattering on the black rocks below. A viewing point has been erected near the waterfall.

The Þjórsárdals hot springs can be located near Háifoss.

Háifoss is the most significant waterfall in the area, but visitors should not overlook the beautiful Hjalparfoss.

Búrfells woods are another natural attractions, being a particularly large forest for Iceland. Þjórsárdalur is, in fact, quite the botanist’s paradise, with many species of wildflower, grass and moss.

Þjórsárdalur is within clear sight of the notorious volcano Hekla, and near the Þjórsá lava, the largest lava field in the country. This lava field holds the famous Kerið crater.

Þjórsárdalur is popular for rock-climbing due to its many sheer cliffs, but note that this should only be done by experts in the company of other experts.

Cultural sites withing Þjórsárdalur

Within Þjórsárdalur is a farm, excavated in 1939, previously covered in the ashes of an eruption from Mount Hekla in 1104, called Þjóveldisbӕrinn the Strong. Nowadays, visitors can witness how houses looked in the Settlement Era.

There is also a hydroelectric power station near Þjórsárdalur, where visitors can witness how Iceland gets the majority of its electrical energy. Though they keep Iceland’s emissions low, these stations are still controversial, as many would prefer a greater focus on geothermal energy, which does not affect the rivers.

Finally, there is a golf course within Þjórsárdalur, for those who want to break their holiday up with a relaxing game.