Kaldidalur

Kaldidalur

The road of Kaldidalur valley  is a highland road, stretching from Thingvellir to Husafell (in Borgarfjordur district),  between Langjokull glacier and Ok shield volcano. It is Iceland's second-highest pass. The Kaldidalur road was a common horse route in former times but was made available for cars around 1930, though only passable for a few months of summer. One can continue to the north through the barren sand area of Storisandur. South of the valley is a cairn wherei

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Karahnjúkar

Karahnjúkar

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Christoph Hess Karahnjúkur describes two mountains and a power plant, found beside each other in east Iceland. The power plant, Karahnjúkavirkjun, is the largest hydroelectric dam in Iceland and is largely used to bring electricity to the Fjarðaál aluminium smelter. While the environmental impact of both of these features has been a storm of controversy, Karahnjúkar is still a popular site for the scale of both

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Kárahnjúkavirkjun

Kárahnjúkavirkjun

Karahnjukavirkjun is a Hydropower plant in Eastern Iceland, designed to 4600 GWh annually to serve Alcoa's aluminium smelter east of Reydarfjordur in Northeast Iceland.  The Karahnjukar plant takes its energy from the dam at Jokulsa a Dal/Bru glacier river and Jokulsa in Fljotsdalur  with five dams altogether and three reservoirs. The largest dam is also the largest of its kind in Europe, 193 m high and 730 m long and comprised of 8.5 million cubic meters of material. Former irri

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Katla

Katla

Katla is an active volcano situated under the glacier Myrdalsjokull in South Iceland. It is one of Iceland's most well known volcanoes. Katla's eruptions have produced many massive glacier bursts, with enormous amounts of water flowing, as the fire melts the ice. Its latest eruption was 1918. That eruption created the spit Kötlutangi, which is the mainland's southernmost tip.

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Katla volcano

Katla volcano

Katla (meaning “Kettle”) is one of Iceland's largest and most active volcanos. Situated in south Iceland, Katla is partially buried underneath Mýrdalsjökull glacier and has a summit of 1512 metres.​ Geography The volcano sits within Katla Geopark, a nature reserve covering 9542 square kilometres (roughly 9% of the country), stretching east from Hvolsvöllur to the black desert sands of Skeiðarársandur, and south from Vatnajökull to Reynisfj

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Keflavík

Keflavík

Keflavík (meaning “Driftwood Bay”) is a town in southwest Iceland, positioned along the Reykjanes coast, 47km from Reykjavík. In 1995, Keflavík merged with Njarðvík and Hafnir to form the municipality of Reykjanesbær, which has a collective population of 15,500. The town is referred to as both Keflavík and Reykjanesbær. History Founded in the 16th century by Scottish entrepreneurs, Keflavík developed on account of its fishin

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Keflavik International Airport

Keflavik International Airport

Keflavík International Airport (KEF) is Iceland’s only international airport and the port of arrival for the vast majority of visitors to the country. In 2016 alone, almost seven million passengers went through its gates. The History of Keflavík International Airport Keflavík International Airport is a relic from the ‘invasion of Iceland’ in World War Two, when Allied troops took over the island nation following the defeat of its colonial ruler, Denmark

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Keilir

Keilir

Mt. Keilir is a volcanic mountain, southwest of Hafnarfjörður, and is the most recognisable landmark on the Reykjanes Peninsula. For visitors travelling from Keflavik Airport, it is arguably their first introduction to the beautiful landscapes around Iceland.  Formation Mt. Keilir is a hyaloclastite mountain, meaning it is made from angular, glassy rock formed by volcanic eruptions underneath an ice sheet. These rock formations can create dazzling shapes and colours. Mt. Kei

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Kerið

Kerið

Kerið is a volcanic crater lake in Grímsnes in south Iceland. It is a popular stop when traveling the Golden Circle. It is believed that Kerið was originally a cone volcano that erupted and and emptied its magma reserve. Once the magma was depleted, the weight of the cone collapsed into an empty magma chamber, later to be filled with water. The Kerið caldera is composed of red volcanic rock and is around 55 m deep, 170 m wide and 270 m across. There is little

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Kerlingarfjöll

Kerlingarfjöll

Kerlingarfjoll is a beautiful and colourful mountain range in the Icelandic highlands that hosts the third largest geothermal area of the interior. This is a young range of mountains, unusually created from rhyolite and both dark and bright tuff stone, about 10,000 years old. A few small glaciers grace a number of their tops. The mountains constantly change colours depending on the light, the sun and the time of day. Kerlingarfjoll are operated as a highland resort, p

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Kirkjubólsdalur

Kirkjubólsdalur

Kirkjubolsdalur is a valley in the Westfjords. The river Kirkjubolsa runs through the valley. The valley  is a good hiking or biking trail, as it offers a great view of the majestic surrounding mountains, such as Breidhorn, Gongudalshorn, Hadegishorn and Grjotskalarhorn.The valley lies not far from Kaldbakur, the highest mountain of the Westfjords, and is a common trail for those who travel the mountain. 

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Kirkjubæjarklaustur

Kirkjubæjarklaustur

Kirkjubæjarklaustur (referred to locally as ‘Klaustur’) is a village of approximately 120 inhabitants in the Skaftárhreppur municipality of south of Iceland. Situated by the Ring Road, approx. 250 km east of Reykjavík, Klaustur is one of the few villages providing amenities—eg. fuel, post office, bank, supermarket— between Vík í Mýrdal and Höfn. History The history of Kirkjubæjarklaustur differs, in many respects, to t

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Kirkjufell

Kirkjufell

Kirkjufell (“Church Mountain”) is a distinctly shaped mountain found on the north coast of Iceland’s Snæfellsnes Peninsula, only a short distance away from the town of Grundarfjörður. Kirkjufell takes it’s name from its resemblance to a church steeple, sharpened at the top with long curved sides. From other angles, the mountain can resemble a witch’s hat or even a freshly scooped ice cream. Photography at Kirkjufell & Kirkjufellsfoss Waterfal

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Kistufell

Kistufell

Kistufell is a mountain in north Iceland, with a highest point of 1450 metres (4757 ft). Hiking and super jeep tours run up the mountain slopes. From here, you can attain spectacular views over Vatnajökull glacier and National Park, as well as the tallest freestanding mountain in Iceland, Mount Snæfell.  Kistufell is part of the Bárðabunga volcanic system, which is renowned for its many earthquakes. An eruption is expected in this area at any time.

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Kjarnaskógur

Kjarnaskógur

Kjarnaskógur is a forest just outside Akureyri Township, and one of the largest forests in the country. It belongs to the Akureyri Municipal Council and is under the guardianship of the Eyjafjörður Forestry commission.  To look at Kjarnaskógur woods today, one would never think that just over half a century ago there was not a tree in sight. Thanks to the reforestation efforts of Iceland, however, Kjarnaskógur has bloomed across 800 hectares and is n

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Kjölur/Kjalvegur

Kjölur/Kjalvegur

Kjolur/Kjalvegur is 600-700 m high mountain pass in the highlands, located east of Langjokull glacier and west of Hofsjokull. It starts by the popular rafting river Hvita (home of Gullfoss) in Arnessysla in the south and the Svartakvisl stream by Hveravellir in the North.  The area is mainly barren, consisting of gravel, sands and lava, though it was better grown in former times. Some high mountains are in the area, such as Hrutfell and Kjalfell. To the north is the geothermal area Hverave

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Kleifarvatn

Kleifarvatn

  Kleifarvatn is the largest lake on the Reykjanes peninsula in Southwest Iceland,  9,1 km², as well as one of Iceland's deepest lakes, reaching a depth of 97 meters. It lies on the fizzure sone of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Kleifarvatn is is located in the southern part of Reykjanes, near the Krysuvik geothermal area and another geothermal area to the east. Following an earthquake in 2000 the lake started receding but has now recovered. However, steam may still be seen ri

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Klettshellir

Klettshellir

Klettshellir is the largest and best known cave in the Westman Islands. The cave lies innermost of sea rock Ystiklettur. It is quite high and has a deep sea level. Brass concerts in the cave are popular, as the cave gives off fantastic accoustics.

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Knútstaðaborg

Knútstaðaborg

Knútsstaðaborg hollow is an open cave, or lava chamber, about 10 square metres (107 square ft.) in size. It is a site surrounded by beauty; birch trees and heather grow all around, and the 2000-year-old lava fields, from the largest eruption in the area since the Ice Age, form fascinating and dramatic shapes across the landscape. Many have compared the lava to the famous Dimmuborgir in the Mývatn area, which is nicknamed ‘the Dark Fortress’ due to the scale of

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Kolugljúfur

Kolugljúfur

  Photo by Regína Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir Kolugljúfur is a gorge that contains a waterfall in north Iceland. It is relatively unknown, but by no means less impressive as a result.  At approximately 1 kilometre long and up to 60 metres (197 ft) wide, the gorge contains the river Víðidalsá, renowned for its salmon. It can be found in between the northern towns of Hvammstangi and Blönduós, by following Route 715 off of Route 1. Both

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Kópavogur

Kópavogur

Kópavogur is a municipality in the Capital Region of Iceland. It is the largest town of those surrounding Reykjavík City, as well as being the second most populated municipality in the country at over 32.000 residents.  The name of the town translates to 'Seal Pup Bay' and refers to the seals that reside in the ocean by the shoreline of the town's oldest part.  The town's Sigil is green and white and displays the Church of Kópavogur, the

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Krafla

Krafla

Krafla is a caldera ca. 10-15 km north of Lake Myvatn in North Iceland. The diameter of the volcano is 10 km and it has a fissure zone of 90 km. Its highest peak is 818 m. It has had 29 reported eruptions in recorded history. Since 1977 the area has been a source of geothermal energy used by Kröfluvirkjun, a 60 MWe power station.  By Krafla is the explosion crater Viti ('Hell'!) formed in the massive Krafla eruption of 1724-9, i.e. the Myvatnseldar ('The Myvatn Fires'

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Krakatindur

Krakatindur

  Krakatindur is a 858 m volcano in Rangarvallasysla in South Iceland. The volcano is located in the Nyjahraun lava field and belongs to the Hekla volcanic system.

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Kristnitökuhraun

Kristnitökuhraun

Kristnitökuhraun is a lava field to the west of Hellisheiði plateau in southwest Iceland. The lava field formed during an eruption in the year 1000, when Icelanders were debating the christening of the nation at national parliament Alþingi at Þingvellir. The story goes that when the eruption started, believers in the old gods claimed that was a token of the wrath of the gods, to which chieftain Snorri Goði is said to have responded "So what were the gods angry abou

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Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

  Krysuvik is a geothermal area in the Reykjanes peninsula in Southwest Iceland, situated in the middle of the fissure zone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Krysuvik you may see all kinds of solfataras, fumaroles, hot springs and mud pots. The soil is colourful, giving of hues of green, red and bright yellow. We also recommend the crater lake Graenavatn, with its luminous green colour, Kleifarvatn, Reykjanes's largest lake and the birdcliff Krysuvikurberg, nesting place o

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Krýsuvíkurbjarg

Krýsuvíkurbjarg

Krýsuvíkurbjarg is a bird cliff in the southern part of the Reykjanes peninsula.  During summer, this sea cliffs host over 60,000 seabirds, with species such as puffins, sandpipers, guillemots and peewits all making it their home. It is, therefore, a paradise for birdwatchers. Located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, this 15 kilometre (49,212 ft.) stretch of cliffs is easily accessible from Reykjavík, and at 40 metres tall, with a face that drops sheerly into the ocean, i

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Kúalaug

Kúalaug

Kúalaug is a set of two small, natural pools, both around 40°C (104°F), in the Bláskógabyggð area. Though they are little, there is enough room for four to six people to bask and enjoy. Please note that the area is delicate and you need to tread carefully not to ruin the flora. The springs are right beside the road, noticeable as the smaller one is surrounded by a ring of stones. There are no changing facilities, but you may leave your clothing on the grass ne

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Kverkfjöll

Kverkfjöll

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Pietro Kverkfjöll is a sub-glacial mountain range on the northern side of the Vatnajökull glacier. Its highest point is 1,764 metres (5787 feet). The mountains here are volcanically active; they cover an enormous magma chamber, the heat of which has led to glacial melting and thus the creation of ice caves. Unlike the ice caves on the southern side of Vatnajökull, however, these are not stable enough to enter. This heating also

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Kvernufoss

Kvernufoss

Photo by Regína Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir. Kvernufoss is a waterfall with a drop of 30 metres (98 feet) in South Iceland. Considered a hidden gem, it rests in a gorge on the South Coast, close to one of Iceland’s most visited waterfalls Skógafoss.  Surroundings  After having visited the highly popular South Coast attractions of Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss, most people continue along the Ring Road to their next destination. East of Skógafoss,

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Lagarfljót

Lagarfljót

Photo from Wikimedia, Creative Commons, by Denkhenk Lagarfjlót is a narrow lake in the east of Iceland, also known as Lögurinn. This feature is best known for three reasons: its natural beauty, its fishing, and its folklore. The latter is of particular interest; it is said that the lake holds a beast called the Lagarfljót Wyrm, a cousin of the Loch Ness Monster with a lot more history. While the earliest records of Nessie go back to the 1870s, the Lagarfjlót Wyrm has

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Lakagígar

Lakagígar

Lakagígar, in the south of the Icelandic highlands, is a row of craters, formed during one of the largest eruptions in recorded history, known as the fires of the River Skafta, or ‘Skaftareldar’ in Icelandic. The area has some of the most stunningly attractive landscapes in Iceland. The majority of the craters are today covered in moss.The total area of the lava field is 565 km² and the estimated volume of volcanic material is over 12 km&sup

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Landmannalaugar

Landmannalaugar

Landmannalaugar ("The people's pools") is a vast area of stunning and unique beauty, the true heart of Iceland's southern Highlands.  Geology  Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically. The area can be found nestled beside the raven-black Laugahraun lava field, a sweeping expanse of dried magma which originally formed in 1477. Landmannalaugar itself is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum

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Landmannaleið

Landmannaleið

Photo from Wikimedia, Creative Commons, by Pietro Landmannaleið, or the F225, is a highland road that leads to the Fjallabak Nature Reserve and towards Landmannalaugar, a region of rhyolite mountain, hot springs and hiking trails. This route is well-known for being much more adventurous than the standard routes into these areas; it crosses rivers, is surrounded by lunar landscapes, and is pretty bumpy. While a two-wheel-drive should never be taken down here, a super jeep can allow you to e

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Langisjór

Langisjór

  Langisjor is among the clearest highland lakes in the country. Its altitude is 670 meters and at its deepest it’s 75 meters. The lake lies southwest of Vatnajokull, between the mountains Tungnarfjoll and Fogrufjoll. The beautiful Fogrufjoll mountains (literally 'The Beautiful Mountains'), to the east of the lake, are a popular hiking place and the waters allow for trout fishing.

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Langjökull

Langjökull

The mighty Langjokull (“The Long Glacier“), in the midwest highlands is the second-largest glacier in Iceland, at 935 km2. For jeep and snowmobile trips, Langjokull is the most popular glacier in Iceland and skiing and hiking is possible as well. We stress that under no circumstances should one travel alone on Langjokull, as there are many cracks in the glacier. Experience of the area, whether that of yourself or of those traveling with you is all important. Highland tracks Two mai

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Látrabjarg

Látrabjarg

  Latrabjarg, in the Westfjords, marks the western-most part of Iceland, and in fact, Europe. Hosting millions of birds, it is Europe’s largest bird cliff at 14 km length and a height of 441 meters. In 1947 Latrabjarg was the site of a famous rescue mission, when Icelandic farmers rescued the 12 surviving members of the British trawler Dhoon that had stranded under the seacliff. This was an astounding deed, and only possible since the local farmers practised egg gathering

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Laufás

Laufás

Laufas, in Eyjafjordur in North Iceland, is a unique turf farmhouse, built in the 19th century and a prime example of the old architecture. Laufas is located a short drive from Akureyri and Grenivik village. The turfhouse functions as a folk museum, bearing great witness to the old ways of farm living. Laufas also has a beautiful church, built in 1865.

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Laugafell

Laugafell

  Laugafell is a small mountain to the north-east of the glacier Hofsjokull, in the Icelandic mid-highlands. On the north-western slopes of Laugafell are geothermal hot springs, mountain huts that are operated in the summer and a cozy natural pool. It is thus a good destination for hikers.

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Laugardalur

Laugardalur

  Laugardalur valley is an area  in Reykjavik. Among its attractions are the remains of the old washing pools - from which the valley derives its name. In Laugardalur there is a botanical garden, and the small but charming domestic animal zoo. The main sporting arena is located in Laugardalur, and is sometimes also used for concerts. The Laugardalslaug swimming pool is the largest swimming pool in Iceland, and definitely the most popular one. The art museums Asmundarsa

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Laugarfell

Laugarfell

Laugarfell is a small mountain in the eastern part of the Icelandic Highlands, with a peak of 827 m (2,713 ft) above sea level. Environment and Surroundings Laugarfell is located in a very desolate area, where the population is less than two inhabitants per square kilometre. Laugarfell, meaning ‘pool mountain’, gets its name from the hot springs that surround it. The many hiking paths around the mountain will lead to two such frequented hot springs, safe for bathing,

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Laugarvalladalur

Laugarvalladalur

Laugarvalladalur is a beautiful, verdant oasis, best known for the many hot springs that sit around the abandoned farm on site. Located west of the river Jökulsá á Dal, and north of the great dam Karahnjúkur, it is a site that very few know of due to its remoteness. Even so, it can be accessed in a four-wheel-drive in summer and has a special appeal to visitors who want to immerse themselves in nature far from the crowds. Within the Laugarvalladalur valley, there is

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Laugarvatn

Laugarvatn

Laugarvatn is a hamlet of around 200 people, by the lake of the same name and originally formed around the boarding school there. It is located in South Iceland, around 93 km from Reykjavik. Laugarvatn is popular as a summer resort and as a stop for travelers, as it is located near many of Iceland’s top attractions, such as Gullfoss and Geysir (part of the Golden Circle) and the ancient Skalholt bishop seat. Environment & Fontana Spa The environment of Laugavatn is very pleasa

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Laugavegur (street)

Laugavegur (street)

  Laugavegur is the main shopping street in Reykjavik, located in the city centre. Laugavegur starts from Bankastraeti in the west and joins Kringlumyrarbraut in the east. Shops, cafés, bars, clubs, hotels, and service companies can be found there as well as residential apartments.  Plenty of old houses with interesting history can be found on Laugavegur.  Nobel author Halldor Laxness lived at Laugavegur 32 in his youth. Note that this street should not be confused with

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Laugavegur hiking trail

Laugavegur hiking trail

The Laugavegur is one of the most popular hiking trails in Iceland. The scenery is breathtaking in its beauty and extremely varied, displaying examples of most all that Icelandic nature has offer. The trail connects the nature reserves Landmannalaugar and Thorsmork. The most common route is to set off from Landmannalaugar, stopping by the huts at Hrafntinnusker, Alftavatn, Hvanngil, Laugahraun and Emstrur (Botnar). People usually divide the hike into 5-6 days. The whole trail is about 55 km.

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Laxnes

Laxnes

Laxnes is a farm in Mosfellsdalur Valley. Nobel author Halldor Laxness was partly brought up here and adopted the farm's name as his surname. Laxness later moved back to Laxnes and made his home in a new house he called Gljufrasteinn, which now functions as a museum in his memory. Laxnes has a hotel and a horse rental, taking you through the beautiful landscape of the valley.

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Leifssafn

Leifssafn

The Leifssafn museum in Budardalur village in West Iceland features the Vinland Exhibit of viking and explorer Leif Ericsson. The exhibition showcases scientifically verified tools and artifacts from the Viking Age. Leif sailed to 'Vinland' in North America, the first European to land there, nearly 500 years before Columbus.

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Leirhnjúkur

Leirhnjúkur

  Leirhnjukur ('Mud Peak') is a 525 m high active volcano, located to the northeast of Lake Myvatn in North Iceland. Leirhnjukur is part of the Krafla caldera. Its last eruption was from 1975 to 1984. At its foot are mud pots and fumaroles are on the flanks.

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Leiðarendi Cave

Leiðarendi Cave

Leidarendi is a lava tube located in the Tvibollahraun lava field, close to the Blue Mountains in Southwest Iceland, about a 25 minutes drive from Reykjavik. Go here to find the Leiðarendi cave tour. Leidarendi is notable for its incredibly diverse and colourful scenery, and is considered a prime example of an Icelandic lava tube. A distinctive feature of Leidarendi is various lava flakes that have fallen from its walls and roof, due to frost and erosion. These flakes indicate the many di

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Litlaá

Litlaá

The beautiful Littlaa is a fresh water river in the Kelduhverfi district by Oxafjordur in North Iceland and is one of Iceland‘s greatest trout rivers. This river is renowned for its strong and fit sea-run brown trouts and sea-run char may be found there as well, along with the occasional salmon. The river is very young, having been formed in the volcanic eruption of Krafla in 1979. It runs through a plain from one of Iceland‘s largest lakes, Skjalftavatn, itself also known for good

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Ljótipollur

Ljótipollur

  Ljotipollur is a explosion crater lake in the south highlands, situated in the southernmost crater in the Veidivotn fissure system. Strangely enough, Ljotipollur's name means 'Ugly Puddle', since this crater anything but, being beautifully red with the deep trout-filled lake at its bottom and high edges on its sides. 

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Lofthellir

Lofthellir

Lofthellir is a lava cave in North Iceland, situated in the lava field of older Laxardalshraun. The Lofthellir lava cave is renowned for having some of the largest, most varied and most beautiful ice sculptures of any lava cave in Iceland and spectacular lava formations as well. 

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Lomagnupur

Lomagnupur

Mt. Lómagnúpur is, very arguably, one of Iceland’s most recognisable mountains, with its proud and dramatic cliff faces, flat, garden-like surroundings and the open blue fjord at its base. Formation The mountain was formed over 1 million years and is largely made of palagonite, with lava beds and sediment making up the base. With a summit peaking at 767m, Mt. Lómagnúpur has been the go-to mountain for professional photographers, writers, climbers, hikers and

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Lóndrangar

Lóndrangar

The Lóndrangar basalt cliffs are amongst the many geological wonders of the Snæfellnes peninsula. Once a volcanic crater, all that remains after aeons of ocean battering are two great pillars upon a cliff, one 75 metres (246 ft) high and the other 61 metres (200 ft). Their dramatic scale earning this incredible formation the nickname ‘the rocky castle’. The cliffs can be accessed easily from the Visitor’s Centre, through fields of mossy lava, but they can also

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Lúdentarborgir

Lúdentarborgir

Ludentarborgir is a crater row east of Lake Myvatn, about 15 meters long. These craters take their name from the explosion crater Ludent, to their north east. The astronauts of space shuttle Appolo 11 trained for their mission in the lunar landscape of Ludentarborgir. The two southernmost craters are known as Threngslaborgir, and that name is often used for the whole crater row, or at least the southern part. A volcanic eruption in the crater area created the Stora Laxarhraun lava field s

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Lundey

Lundey

  Lundey ('Puffin Island') is a small uninhabited island off the western coast of Reykjavik. It is a haven for seabirds. The island is about 400 m long and 150 m wide, reaching a height of 14 m above sea level. Among the many seabirds that frequent the island are puffins, fulmars, arctic terns and black guillemots. Many sightseeing tours to the island by boat operate from Sundahofn pier by the Reykjavik shore.

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Lyngdalsheiði

Lyngdalsheiði

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Christian Bickel. Lyngdalsheiði is a heathland in South Iceland, known for its numerous caves.  Located between Lake Laugarvatn and Þingvellir National Park, Lyngdalsheiði is geologically an exceptionally flat and gently sloping lava shield, believed to have been formed around 120,000 years ago during the last interglacial period.  Sights and Surroundings For the arrival of King Frederick VIII of Denmark in 1904, a road wa

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Lækjargata

Lækjargata

  Laekjargata is a street in central Reykjavik. The street has some of Reykjavik's oldest houses and features several cafés, restaurants shops and stores.  The name of the street is derived from an open spring that used to flow alongside the street, from the pond to the sea. A tourist information centre is by Laekjartorg square, as is the District Court. Across the street is the House of Government, a prison in former times. Reykjavik Art Festival has its headquarters at L

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Magni

Magni

  Magni is one of the two youngest craters in Iceland, along with Modi. The craters are situated between glaciers Myrdalsjokull and Eyjafjallajokull and were both formed in the Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in 2010. They still steam with lava glowing under the surface. From the top you'll have an excellent view of the glaciers and the beautiful Thorsmork valley.

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Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon

Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon

Photo Credit: Wikimedia. Creative Commons. Borvan53. Markarfljótsgljúfur is a canyon in Iceland's southern Highlands, west of Hvolsvöllur. Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon is less known than many of its counterparts across the country, but the visitor numbers do little to diminish just how stunning this natural gorge truly is. One of the major reasons for its lack of visitors is its location in the Icelandic Highlands. Markarfljótsgljúfur is n

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Melrakkaey

Melrakkaey

Melrakkaey ("Fox Island") is a small island found at the mouth of Grundarfjörður. Melrakkaey was protected in 1972 and today, only those with permission from the Nature Conservation Agency may visit.  As with the majority of islands along the shallow, 50 km (31 mi) bay Breiðafjörður, Melrakkaey was, historically, a source of sustenance for the local population. Not only was the island used for fishing—ruins of these fishing outposts still exist&mdash

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