Litlaá

Litlaá

The beautiful Littlaa is a fresh water river in the Kelduhverfi district by Oxafjordur in North Iceland and is one of Iceland‘s greatest trout rivers. This river is renowned for its strong and fit sea-run brown trouts and sea-run char may be found there as well, along with the occasional salmon. The river is very young, having been formed in the volcanic eruption of Krafla in 1979. It runs through a plain from one of Iceland‘s largest lakes, Skjalftavatn, itself also known for good

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Litlibær

Litlibær

Wikimedia. Creative Commons. Credit: Christian Bickel Litlibær is a small turf farmstead found nearby to the coastal town of Ísafjörður, in the Westfjords. The farmstead was originally built in 1875, proving it to be a historic point of interest in the Westfjords, and continued its original operation until 1969. The National Museum of Iceland has since taken responsibility for its maintenance, and today, the farmstead serves as a small museum and cafe. Today, the

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Ljósufjöll

Ljósufjöll

Ljósufjöll is a central volcano and fissure vent system, located on the Snæfellsnes peninsula’s volcanic zone in West Iceland.  Geology and History The system’s length is approximately 90 kilometres (56 miles), and its highest point is at 988 metres (3,421 ft) above sea level. Ljósufjöll reaches from the lava field Berserkjahraun to the university village Bifröst and its volcanic Grábrók craters. The eruption that created the

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Ljótipollur

Ljótipollur

  Ljotipollur is a explosion crater lake in the south highlands, situated in the southernmost crater in the Veidivotn fissure system. Strangely enough, Ljotipollur's name means 'Ugly Puddle', since this crater anything but, being beautifully red with the deep trout-filled lake at its bottom and high edges on its sides. 

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Lofthellir

Lofthellir

Lofthellir is a lava cave in North Iceland, situated in the lava field of older Laxardalshraun. The Lofthellir lava cave is renowned for having some of the largest, most varied and most beautiful ice sculptures of any lava cave in Iceland and spectacular lava formations as well. 

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Lomagnupur

Lomagnupur

Mt. Lómagnúpur is, very arguably, one of Iceland’s most recognisable mountains, with its proud and dramatic cliff faces, flat, garden-like surroundings and the open blue fjord at its base. Formation The mountain was formed over 1 million years and is largely made of palagonite, with lava beds and sediment making up the base. With a summit peaking at 767m, Mt. Lómagnúpur has been the go-to mountain for professional photographers, writers, climbers, hikers and

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Lóndrangar

Lóndrangar

The Lóndrangar basalt cliffs are amongst the many geological wonders of the Snæfellnes peninsula. Once a volcanic crater, all that remains after aeons of ocean battering are two great pillars upon a cliff, one 75 metres (246 ft) high and the other 61 metres (200 ft). Their dramatic scale earning this incredible formation the nickname ‘the rocky castle’. The cliffs can be accessed easily from the Visitor’s Centre, through fields of mossy lava, but they can also

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Loðmundarfjörður

Loðmundarfjörður

Loðmundarfjörður is a fjord in the northern part of the East Fjords of Iceland. The fjord sits between Seyðisfjörður and Eskifjörður. It was named by Loðmundur hinn gamli, or Loðmundur the old, who settled there after following his ship's high seat pillars that he tossed into the sea, as was the custom of the time. Today, the region is mostly uninhabited except for herds of reindeer and flocks of sheep. See also: Wildlife and Animals in Ice

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Lúdentarborgir

Lúdentarborgir

Ludentarborgir is a crater row east of Lake Myvatn, about 15 meters long. These craters take their name from the explosion crater Ludent, to their north east. The astronauts of space shuttle Appolo 11 trained for their mission in the lunar landscape of Ludentarborgir. The two southernmost craters are known as Threngslaborgir, and that name is often used for the whole crater row, or at least the southern part. A volcanic eruption in the crater area created the Stora Laxarhraun lava field s

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Lundey

Lundey

  Lundey ('Puffin Island') is a small uninhabited island off the western coast of Reykjavik. It is a haven for seabirds. The island is about 400 m long and 150 m wide, reaching a height of 14 m above sea level. Among the many seabirds that frequent the island are puffins, fulmars, arctic terns and black guillemots. Many sightseeing tours to the island by boat operate from Sundahofn pier by the Reykjavik shore.

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Lyngdalsheiði

Lyngdalsheiði

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Christian Bickel. Lyngdalsheiði is a heathland in South Iceland, known for its numerous caves.  Located between Lake Laugarvatn and Þingvellir National Park, Lyngdalsheiði is geologically an exceptionally flat and gently sloping lava shield, believed to have been formed around 120,000 years ago during the last interglacial period.  Sights and Surroundings For the arrival of King Frederick VIII of Denmark in 1904, a road wa

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Lækjargata

Lækjargata

  Laekjargata is a street in central Reykjavik. The street has some of Reykjavik's oldest houses and features several cafés, restaurants shops and stores.  The name of the street is derived from an open spring that used to flow alongside the street, from the pond to the sea. A tourist information centre is by Laekjartorg square, as is the District Court. Across the street is the House of Government, a prison in former times. Reykjavik Art Festival has its headquarters at L

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Magni

Magni

  Magni is one of the two youngest craters in Iceland, along with Modi. The craters are situated between glaciers Myrdalsjokull and Eyjafjallajokull and were both formed in the Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in 2010. They still steam with lava glowing under the surface. From the top you'll have an excellent view of the glaciers and the beautiful Thorsmork valley.

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Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon

Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon

Photo Credit: Wikimedia. Creative Commons. Borvan53. Markarfljótsgljúfur is a canyon in Iceland's southern Highlands, west of Hvolsvöllur. Markarfljótsgljúfur Canyon is less known than many of its counterparts across the country, but the visitor numbers do little to diminish just how stunning this natural gorge truly is. One of the major reasons for its lack of visitors is its location in the Icelandic Highlands. Markarfljótsgljúfur is n

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Melrakkaey

Melrakkaey

Melrakkaey ("Fox Island") is a small island found at the mouth of Grundarfjörður. Melrakkaey was protected in 1972 and today, only those with permission from the Nature Conservation Agency may visit.  As with the majority of islands along the shallow, 50 km (31 mi) bay Breiðafjörður, Melrakkaey was, historically, a source of sustenance for the local population. Not only was the island used for fishing—ruins of these fishing outposts still exist&mdash

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Miðás Breeding Farm

Miðás Breeding Farm

Midas is a horse farm near Hella in South Iceland. The farm is run by farmers Asta Begga Olafsdottir and Gisli Sveinsson. It features a stable, a riding hall and a residental house where the farmers live.  The farmers breed and sell horses and offer horse riding tour from 2-6 days. The farm has has great riding facilities and riding paths and you'll be offered excellent instruction. Much care is taken to find a horse that suits each rider and ensure that the riders find their dream

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Miðnesheiði

Miðnesheiði

Miðnesheiði is a heath on the Reykjanes peninsula. Keflavik airport is located on this heath, as well as the abandoned American military base. In 1951 the Icelandic government made a treaty with the United States concerning military protection and for an American military base to be built on Miðnesheiði. This decicion was highly controversial and a source for heated debates and protests for decades. The base itself became a kind of a village in its own right with 5000 peopl

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Morsárfoss

Morsárfoss

Morsárfoss is Iceland's tallest waterfall, measuring 228 metres. In fact, there are several waterfalls in the area, and sometimes people talk about Morsárfossar (the waterfall's name in plural). Many people claim that Glymur is Iceland's tallest waterfall (at 198 metres), and for many years it was. However, in 2007, Morsárjökull glacier - an outlet glacier of Vatnajökull glacier, had started to melt and these new waterfalls were formed a

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Mosfellsbær

Mosfellsbær

Mosfellsbær, colloquially known as “The Green Town”, is a town in southwest Iceland, 15 minutes drive away from the island’s capital, Reykjavik. Mosfellsbær has a rough population of 9000 inhabitants. As its nickname suggests, the town has a reputation for beauty, vegetation and greenhouses.  Culture The town has a long history of literature and writers. The Viking warrior poet, Egil Skallagrimsson, is supposedly buried near the town of Mosfellsbær, alo

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Mosfellsdalur

Mosfellsdalur

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Stig Nygaard. Mosfellsdalur is a valley, located approximately 20 kilometres (12 miles) from Iceland’s capital city of Reykjavík.  The valley of Mosfellsdalur is a lush and scenic lowland that, despite sitting very close to the capital, is often forgotten by the locals. The picturesque valley is the perfect countryside getaway, where travellers can enjoy golfing, horse riding, sightseeing or hiking. Mosfellsdalur Viking Village

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Móskarðshnjúkar

Móskarðshnjúkar

Móskarðshnjúkar is a mountain and popular hiking route, situated in the south-west corner of Iceland next to Mt. Esja.  The mountain can be seen from Reykjavík City and is celebrated both as a hiking trail and venue for backcountry skiing. Móskarðshnjúkar sits right next to Mt. Esja, but is more challenging to get to and therefore much less crowded. Making your way here is very awarding, where avid treckers are greeted with sweeping rhyolite lands

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Móði

Móði

  Modi is one of the two youngest craters in Iceland, along with Magni. These two craters are situated between glaciers Myrdalsjokull and Eyjafjallajokull and were both formed in the Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in 2010. They still emanate steam with lava glowing under the surface. From the top you'll have a great view of the glaciers and the beautiful Thorsmork valley.

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Möðrudalur

Möðrudalur

Modrudalur a Fjollum is the highest positioned farm in Iceland (469 m above sea level) and is located in the east highlands, north of Vatnajokull glacier. It's a short drive from the Ring Road, about 20 km. The farmland of Modrudalur is one of the most extensive in the country and there is a interesting church by the farm, built in 1949 by farmer Jon Adalsteinn Stefansson in memory of his wife. Its inner decorations and altarpiece were made by him as well. Möðrudalsheiði is a

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Munkaþverárkirkja

Munkaþverárkirkja

Munkathverarkirkja is a beautiful wooden church in the fjord of Eyjafjordur in North Iceland. The current church was built in 1844 by Thorsteinn Danielsson. It was further renovated in the years 1985-6, the graveyard was leveled and a gathering house was built for the congregation. The church has a choir space and has room for 160 people. On its 100th year anniversary,it was painted by painter Haukur Stefansson, who also decorated the pulpit.  It is believed that soon after the advent of

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Mýrdalsjökull

Mýrdalsjökull

Mýrdalsjökull is a glacier in the south of the Icelandic highlands. It is the country's fourth largest ice cap, covering nearly 600 kilometres squared, and its highest peak is almost 1500 meters tall. It is most well-known for sitting atop the notorious and explosive volcano, Katla. Mýrdalsjökull is visible from Route 1 on the South Coast, sitting to the north of the village of Vík. Eruptions beneath Mýrdalsjökull Since 2010, the world has known

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Myrdalssandur

Myrdalssandur

Mýrdalssandur is an outwash plain located between the rivers of Kúðafljót, in the east, and Múlakvísl, in the west, both of which carry water down from the glacier, Mýrdalsjökull. Mýrdalssandur has a 35km (22mi) long coastline which includes Kötlutangi, the southernmost point of the Iceland's mainland.  Culture Around the year 1000, many farmers set up shop on Mýrdalssandur. By the 15th century, however, most of the

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Mývatn

Mývatn

  Myvatn is a beautiful lake with many small islands in the north of Iceland, the fourth largest lake in the country. Along with its surrounding area, the lake is one of Iceland's most amazing natural attractions. Some of the islands in Myvatn are pseudocraters, formed by steam explosions. The lake has rich birdlife and more species of ducks than anywhere else in the world. As for vegetation, it is one of the few places in the world that grows Marimo, also known as

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Mývatn Nature Baths

Mývatn Nature Baths

Photo from Goðafoss Waterfall and the Mývatn Nature Baths The Mývatn Nature Baths are a set of geothermally heated pools and steam baths found in the Lake Mývatn area. They are about two kilometres east of the village of Reykjahlíð. Opened in 2004, the Nature Baths can be considered to be somewhat of a northern equivalent of the world-famous Blue Lagoon Spa, found in Iceland's south-west. Facilities and Price of the Mývatn Nature Baths The M&yac

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Námafjall Geothermal Area

Námafjall Geothermal Area

The Namafjall geothermal field is located in Northeast Iceland, on the east side of Lake Myvatn.  At this area, also known as Hverir, you may see many solfataras and boiling mud pots, surrounded by sulfur crystals of many different colours. The area is quite smelly but something one gets used to after a while. The soil in the area has little growth and is sour due to erosion and the sulfur from the atmosphere. Indeed, the old rock-covered boreholes in the area give off a lot of hot steam,

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Námaskarð

Námaskarð

Námaskarð Pass is a geothermal area on the mountain Námafjall, in north Iceland, less than half an hour’s drive from Lake Mývatn. It is located by Route 1, which encircles the country. Connected to the Krafla volcano system, Námaskarð is home to many hot-springs, mud-pots and fumaroles. Geography of Námaskarð Námaskarð is notable due to its barrenness; no vegetation grows on its slopes. This is due to the heat beneath the earth

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National Museum

National Museum

  The Icelandic National Museum, located at Sudurgata 41 in Reykjavik, displays objects providing a great insight to the nation's cultural history. The museum has a permanent exhibition, 'The making of a Nation', conceived as a journey through time and including around 2000 objects dating from settlement time to the modern age. It also features many temporary exhibitions. The museum supports and supervises historic buildings throughout the country.

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Nauthólsvík

Nauthólsvík

  Nautholsvik beach is a highly popular resort, located southwest of Oskjuhlid in Reykjavik. Nautholsvik offers great opportunites for for sunbathing, swimming and sea sport in the geothermically heated water.

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Nauthúsagil

Nauthúsagil

Photo by Regína Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir. Nauthúsagil is a narrow ravine in South Iceland, located beneath the glacial volcano Eyjafjallajökull.  Location and History A true hidden gem of Iceland's South Coast, the Nauthúsagil ravine sits behind the farm Stóra-Mörk, past the famed waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss and Gljúfrabúi. The name of this natural pearl translates to ‘Bull Shed Ravine’ and references an outlying

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Nesgjá

Nesgjá

Nesgja is a fresh water fissure in North Iceland, close to Husavik and Asbyrgi. It is one of Iceland‘s top dives.    As with the Silfra fissure at Thingvellir, Nesgja bears witness to the tectonic drift, being situated where the Eurasian and American plates meet. While shallow (4 meters deep), Nesgja is amazing in its beauty, crystal clear and offering an underwater view of over 100 meters. You might also be able to spot the occasional  arctic charr while diving in Nesgja,

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Nesjavallavirkjun

Nesjavallavirkjun

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Gretar Ivarsson. Nesjavallavirkjun is a geothermal power station in southwestern Iceland, operated by Orka náttúrunnar (ON Power).  The plant is the second-largest of its kind in Iceland and sits close to Þingvellir National Park and the Hengill Volcano. History and Operation Construction of Nesjavallavirkjun began in 1987 and operations started in September 1990. However, plans for harnessing the field for power and heat

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Nesjavellir

Nesjavellir

At the Nesjavellir geothermal area in Southwest Iceland, you’ll find Iceland’s second-largest geothermal power station. The Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station is located a short drive from the Hengill geothermal area and Thingvellir National Park. The power station produces around 120 MW of electrical power and around 1,110 liters of hot water (80-85°C) per second. The power station serves the Greater Reykjavik Area.

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Neskaupstaður

Neskaupstaður

Neskaupstadur, in the fjord Nordfjordur, is a fishing town of around 1500 people in East Iceland. It is the largest town of the municipality of Fjardabyggd. Neskaupstadur has a strong fishing industry, is close to attractive nature, features an interesting museum and hosts two popular annual festivals. Economy The fishing industry is the mainstay of Neskaupstadur's economy, along with services and tourism. One of the largest fishing companies in Iceland, Sildarvinnslan hf, has its headquar

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Njarðvík

Njarðvík

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Marek Slusarczyk. Njarðvík is a town located on the Reykjanes Peninsula in the southwestern part of Iceland.  The town is named after an estuary on the northern part of the Reykjanes Peninsula, east of the spit Miðnes. Njarðvík consists of two regions, called Innri Njarðvík and Ytri Njarðvík, or ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ Njarðvík. Subsequently, the locals often refer

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Norræna húsið

Norræna húsið

Credit: The Nordic House Facebook.  The Nordic House (Est. 1968) is a cultural institution and exhibition space in Reykjavík which aims to nurture cultural connectivity between Iceland and Scandinavia. The man responsible for the Nordic House's impressive architect is Finnish modernist designer, Alvar Aalto. The building is an excellent example of the architect's signature designs; white tiling, wood panelling, organically sculpted walls and ceilings and even his own inner

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North Iceland

North Iceland

North Iceland is very popular area in Iceland and contains some of the best attractions on the island. Akureyri is the capital of North Iceland and is the second largest "city" in Iceland. Around 20.000 people live in North Iceland. The North coast has four major fjords (or bays) with mountain ridges between them and each of the fjords has corresponding agricultural districts. The main districts are: Hunathing, Skagafjordur district, Eyjafjordur district and the amazing Thingeyjarsys

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Nýidalur/Jökuldalur

Nýidalur/Jökuldalur

Nyidalur (a.k.a. Jokuldalur) is a valley in the Icelandic highlands, south of the glacier Tungnafellsjokull and north of Hofsjokull glacier. It is a frequent stop for travelers of the highlands, as huts of The Icelandic Touring Association are located there. The huts are located around 800 m above sea level at the mouth of the valley. The older hut has two floors. They both have a kitchen, a warden’s room, and a sleeping hall, with further sleeping quarters on the above floor. They both a

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Óbyggðasetrið

Óbyggðasetrið

Óbyggðasetrið, also known as the Wilderness Center, is a highland adventure hub which caters to those with a passion for the surrounding wild nature, and an interest in Iceland’s past. It provides a variety of essential services, including accommodation in renovated and preserved old buildings, and homemade and locally produced food at its restaurant. Since June 2016, it has hosted an exhibition on life in and near the highlands, where visitors can walk up a 3 km (9842 ft.

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Odadahraun

Odadahraun

Odadahraun is the most extensive lava field in Iceland, with a total area of around 4-6000 km² (definitions vary), consisting of relatively young and rough lava. It lies north of Vatnajokull and at its northern border are mountains Blafjall and Sellandafjall. Its boundaries are further marked by the great glacier rivers Skjalfandafljot to the west and Jokulsa a Fjollum to the east.  The area is dry and there is little as no vegetation. Sand storms there can also be very strong. Th

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Ofaerufoss

Ofaerufoss

Ofaerufoss is a highly beautiful waterfall in the volcanic chasm Eldgja in Southeast Iceland. The Eldgja chasm, belongs to the same volcanic system as the famous Katla, which lies under the Myrdalsjokull icecap. Ofaerufoss is two-split and there used to be a natural bridge across the lower one, but it collapsed from natural causes in the early nineties.

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Ögmundarhraun

Ögmundarhraun

Photo from Wikimedia, Creative Commons, by Reykholt Ögmundarhraun is a lava field on the southern side of the Reykjanes Peninsula, which was formed by an enormous lava flow during an eruption in 1151 AD. When Ögmundarhraun was still a burning liquid, it incinerated farms and houses in the area. It remains possible, however, to see some of the remains from the destruction, particularly near the beach Selatangar, a haunted and long-since abandoned fishing outpost.  This lava fiel

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Ok

Ok

  Ok (rhyming with 'talk' rather than 'O.K.') is a 1198 meters shield volcano. The volcano lies west of Langjokull in the Icelandic highlands, near Borgarfjordur district. It erupted during interglacials in the Pleistoscene age. The volcano is relatively flat, with a central crater. The volcano was formerly covered by a glacier cap that is now wholly disappeared.

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Ólafsfjörður

Ólafsfjörður

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Michal Gorski. Ólafsfjörður is a town in North Iceland with a population of approximately 785 people.  The town is located in a fjord of the same name. Together with the town of Siglufjörður, Ólafsfjörður forms the larger municipality of Fjallabyggð.  History  Ólafsfjörður started to form at the end of the 19th Century, before growing around its harbour during the go

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Ólafsvík

Ólafsvík

Olafsvik is a fishing town of just over a 1000 people, located on the west side of the Snaefellsnes peninsula.  Economy and services Olafsvik has a good natural harbour and it has a thriving fishing industry. Other main sources of the economy are commerce and services. Accomodation can be had in the town, at Hotel Olafsvik, sleeping bag accommodation is available at the Lysuholl Community Center, and camping grounds are open from June through August. Cultural attractions The Pakkhus at

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Ölfus

Ölfus

  Olfus is a area in Arnessysla county, with its boundaries at Olfusa in the east and the Hellisheidi plateau in the west. The landscape of Olfus is characterised by much lava, and wetlands. There is strong geothermal activity in the area and earthquakes are frequent. Olfus stretches southwest towards sands and lava.  The area offers good services and is noted for its greenhouse fruits and horse-riding tours. The towns Hveragerdi, Thorlakshofn and Arbaejarhverfi belong to Olfus, th

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Ölkelda

Ölkelda

  Olkelda is a farm in the south of Snaefellsnes, taking its name from a renowned mineral spring close by. The pristine mineral spring by the Olkelda farm is a nature reserve. The water is excellent for drinking and hence the place has become highly popular for travelers. 

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Öræfajökull

Öræfajökull

  Oraefajokull is a glacier volcano in South-East Iceland. On its north-western side is Iceland's highest peak, Hvannadalshnjukur (2109 m). Oraefajokull, which has several glacier tounges of its own, is considered a part of the larger Vatnajokull and thus belongs to Vatnajokull National Park. It has erupted twice, in 1362 and 1727.

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Öskjuvatn

Öskjuvatn

  Oskjuvatn is a large crater lake in the Askja caldera in the Dyngjufjoll mountains, north of Vatnajokull glacier. Oskjuvatn is Iceland's second-deepest lake. The depth of Oskjuvatn is 217 m (712 feet) and it has a surface area of 11 km². The lake was formed in the volcanic eruption of 1875, at the same time as the Viti crater. Askja's latest eruption was in 1962.

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Öxarárfoss

Öxarárfoss

Öxarárfoss is a waterfall situated within Þingvellir National Park in southwest Iceland.  The waterfall flows out the river Öxará, cascading in two drops over the cliffs of Almannagjá gorge, which marks the eastern boundary of the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates.  Features and Surroundings  The waterfall has a height of 13 metres (44 feet) and an average width of 6 metres (20 feet). The pool of water at the water

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Öxarfjörður

Öxarfjörður

Oxarfjordur (a.k.a. Axarfordur) is a fjord in North-East Iceland between the headlands Tjornes and Melrakkasletta. As the fjord is rather wide, it might as well be considered a bay. The landscape by Oxarfjordur is attractive, featuring woodlands and tuff mountains. Around the farming district Nupasveit are moss-covered lava fields, sands and heathery moors. As for wildlife, Oxarfjordur has over 56 recorded bird species and is one of the main nesting places in Iceland for the the rare horn

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Öxnadalur

Öxnadalur

Oxnadalur is a magnificent valley in the fjord Eyjafjordur in North Iceland. Priest, poet and translator Jon Thorlaksson lived there in his later days and to his daying day, at the farm Baegisa. Jonas Hallgrimsson, one of Iceland's most beloved poets, was born in the valley, at the farm Hraun. Jon was one of the champions of the Elightenment in Iceland. As well as being a notable priest and poet, he translated such major works as John Milton‘s Paradise Lost, Alexander Pope‘s

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Papey

Papey

The quiet and quaint island of Papey can be found off Iceland's east coast, in the municipality of Djúpavogshreppur. Roughly 2 square kilometres in size, with its highest point 59m above sea level, the island is famous amongst birdwatchers and nature lovers for its large colony of Atlantic Puffins and guillemot, and is a popular day tour destination for those looking for a break from the mainland.  History Aside from the bird population, Papey today is uninhabited. This has not

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Patreksfjörður

Patreksfjörður

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, by Emstrur Located in the Westfjords of Iceland, Patreksfjörður is a charming village of approximately 650 inhabitants.  This settlement, in the southern part of the region, is close to many major attractions. Those in the nearest vicinity include Dynjandi, one of the country’s most unique and spectacular waterfalls, Látrabjarg, Iceland’s best birdwatching spot, and Rauðasandur, a beautiful beach with orange sands.

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Perlan

Perlan

Perlan ('The Pearl') is a museum and rotating glass dome built on top of six water tanks that together store 24 million litres of Reykjavík's hot water. Surrounded by trees, Perlan stands on top of Öskjuhlíð Hill and is one of the capital's most distinctive landmarks. History & Construction The building was originally designed by architect Ingimundur Sveinsson and in 1991, the hot water storage tanks that had stood on top of Öskjuhl&i

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Raufarhólshellir

Raufarhólshellir

Photo from The Lava Tunnel | Raufarholshellir Caving Tour Raufarhólshellir is the fourth longest lava tube in Iceland at 1,360 metres (4,461 ft). It is also remarkably spacious, between 10 and 30 metres wide (33 to 99 ft) and up to 10 metres tall (33 ft). One of the closest caves to Reykjavík, it is accessible throughout the year on sanctioned tours. It is also accessible to more people than caves such as Leiðarendi, as it requires no crawling or clambering to get throug

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