Informationen über: Nesjavellir

 

Nesjavellir is a geothermal area in southwest Iceland. It is most famous for being home to the Nesjavellir geothermal power station, the second largest of its kind in the country.

Due to its location, Nesjavellir is a hotbed of geothermal and geological activity. It is just north of the town of Hveragerði, which is notorious for its ground randomly collapsing into hot springs, and the naturally heated river in the valley of Reykjadalur.

The volcanic phenomena of the area are due to the fact that it is located on the Mid Atlantic Rift, which separates the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. The best-known place to see this rift valley is Þingvellir National Park, which just to the north of the geothermal power station across the lake Þingvallavatn, the second largest lake in the country.

The primary attraction for visitors within Nesjavallir is the Hengill Geothermal Area, located on a volcano of the same name. This is a beautiful site with many hiking trails, dramatic views and seething geothermal areas. 

The Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station

The Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station is located a short drive from the Hengill Geothermal Area. The power station produces around 120 MW of electrical power and around 1,110 litres of hot water (80-85°C) per second. The power station serves the Greater Reykjavik Area.

Though Iceland gets over twenty percent of its energy from power stations such as that at Nesjavellir, the rest is hydroelectric, from the many dams across the country. As the development of geothermal energy continues, it will soon take up a larger proportion of the county’s power, being more environmentally friendly.

As geothermal energy also used to supply homes with hot water sustainably, you will find that warm shower smells similarly sulfuric to Iceland’s geothermal area.

Dienstleistungen in der Nähe: Nesjavellir

Alle Dienstleistungen in 50km Radius

Attraktionen in der Umgebung: Nesjavellir

Nesjavallavirkjun

Credit: Wikimedia, Creative Commons. Photo by Gretar Ivarsson. Nesjavallavirkjun is a geothermal power station in southwestern Iceland, operated by O...

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Hengladalsá

Hengladalsa is a river in Southwest Iceland.  The river has its source by the Hengill area, from valleys Innstidalur, Middalur and Fremstidalur,...

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Reykjadalur

Reykjadalur, the Valley of Steam, is a beautiful geothermal region close to the southern town Hveragerði. It is a popular place for hiking and h...

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Hengill

Hengill is an enormous mountain in south-west Iceland, covering an area of about 100 square kilometres. It is a vital source of energy for south Ice...

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Hellisheiðarvirkjun

The Hellisheidi Power Station is the largest geothermal powerstation in Iceland and the second-largest in the world. The power station is located by...

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The Geothermal Energy Exhibition

Photo from the Geothermal Exhibition The Geothermal Energy Exhibition is an interactive museum on Iceland’s volcanic processes at Hellisheið...

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Þingvallavatn

Þingvallavatn (anglicised to Thingvallavatn, ‘the Lake of the Fields of Parliament’) is a rift valley lake located roughly forty-m...

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Hellisheiði

Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Photo Credit: ThinkGeoEnergy Hellisheiði is a lava plateau east of Reykavík, approximately 380 metres (1,247 ...

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Ringstraße

Iceland has one main road: Route 1, or the Icelandic Ring Road. This ring road goes all around the island and is 1,332 kilometres long (828 miles), ...

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Kristnitökuhraun

Kristnitökuhraun is a lava field to the west of Hellisheiði plateau in southwest Iceland. The lava field formed during an eruption in the ye...

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Golden Circle

The Golden Circle is a 300 kilometre (186 mile) route to the three most popular natural attractions in Iceland: the Geysir Geothermal Area, Gullfoss...

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Heiðmörk

Wikimedia. Creative Commons. Credit: TommyZ Heiðmörk is a conservation area on the outskirts of Reykjavík, popular amongst locals and...

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Þórsmörk

Nestled between the glaciers Eyjafjallajökull, Mýrdalsjökull, and Tindfjallajökull is Þórsmörk, the Valley o...

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Hveragerði

Hveragerði is a town and municipality in the southwest of Iceland. It is often nicknamed ‘the Earthquake Town’ or ‘the Hot Spr...

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Ingólfsfjall

Ingólfsfjall is a 551 metre (1807 feet) tall tuff mountain, named after the country’s first official settler, Ingólfur Arnarson,...

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Skalafell

Photo From: Skíðasvæðin - Bláfjöll & Skálafell Facebook.  Skálafell is a volcanic mounta...

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Gjábakkahellir

Gjabakkahellir (a.k.a. Helguhellir or Stelpuhellir ('Girl cave')) is a  lava tube, located in the area of Thingvellir National Park. Gja...

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Þingvellir

Þingvellir National Park is the only UNESCO World Heritage site on the Icelandic mainland and one of the three stops on the world famous Golde...

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Gljufrasteinn

“Whoever doesn't live in poetry cannot survive here on earth.” These are the words of the late Halldór Kiljan Laxness, a 1955 N...

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Þrengsli und Þrengslavegur

Þrengslavegur is a road in Iceland that connects Route 1 to the towns along the southern coastline, whereas Þrengsli is a picturesque...

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