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Jökulsárlón Travel Guide

4.8
7489 Google reviews
Type
Glacier Lagoons, Bird Sights
Destination
Vatnajokull national park
High Season
Jun - Aug & Nov - Jan
Family Friendly
Yes
Area
18 sq km
Outflow
Atlantic Ocean
Length
1.5 km
Depth
284 m
Average rating
4.8
Number of reviews
7489

Jökulsárlón is one of Iceland's most popular and unique attractions

Jökulsárlón is Iceland’s most famous glacier lagoon. Conveniently located in the southeast by Route 1, about halfway between the Skaftafell Nature Reserve and Höfn, it is a popular stop for those travelling along the South Coast or around the Ring Road of the country.

This beautiful location is the highlight of many self-drive tours and guided packages; both this 10-Day Summer Road Trip and 6-Day Summer Vacation feature it. Those renting a car can also access it in the south-east of the country. Alternatively, take a tour of Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon.

Geography

As a glacier lagoon, Jökulsárlón is a lake that is filled with the meltwater from an outlet glacier. In this case, it is Breiðamerkurjökull, a tongue of Europe’s largest ice cap, Vatnajökull.

It stands out, however, due to the fact that it also fills with icebergs breaking from the glacier, some of which tower several stories high.

These icebergs, other than their scale, are notable for their colouration. Although they are, as expected, largely white, most are also dyed electric blue in part, with black streaks of ash from eruptions centuries past.

The glacier lagoon of Jökulsárlón is many travellers' favourite destination.

When the icebergs finally make it across the lagoon, they either drift out to sea or wash up on the nearby shore. Because of the way they glisten against the black sands of Breiðamerkursandur, this area has been nicknamed ‘the Diamond Beach’.

In spite of being a rather recent formation, Jökulsárlón is the deepest lake in the country, with depths of 248 metres (814 feet). With a surface area of 18 square kilometres (7 square miles), it is also growing to be one of the largest.

History

Jökulsárlón has not been around since Iceland’s settlement; it only formed around 1935. This was due to rapidly rising temperatures in the country from the turn of the twentieth century; since 1920, Breiðamerkurjökull has been shrinking at a dramatic rate, and the lagoon has begun to fill its space.

Today, the expansion of Jökulsárlón is accelerating. In 1975, it had less than half its current surface area.

In the relatively near future, it is expected that the lagoon will continue to grow until it becomes a large, deep fjord.

Though a dark omen for Iceland’s glaciers and ice caps in general, the retreat of Breiðamerkurjökull has resulted in an incredibly beautiful, if temporary, site. This has not been overlooked by Hollywood.

Many films and television shows have featured Jökulsárlón.

Jökulsárlón has been featured in the James Bond films A View to Kill in 1985 and Die Another Day in 2002, 2001’s Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, and 2005’s Batman Begins.

In 2017, Jökulsárlón was enveloped into the Vatnajökull National Park, thus it is now fully protected by Icelandic law.

Wildlife

Because of the wealth of herring and capelin that the tides bring into the lagoon, Jökulsárlón is somewhat of a hot-spot for Iceland’s wildlife.

In summer, it is a nesting site for Arctic Terns; stay well away from their nesting area, as these birds are notorious for the fierceness with which they protect their eggs, dive-bombing the heads of any they see as a threat. Skuas also nest on the lake’s shores in this season.

Seals can be reliably spotted here throughout the year, swimming amongst or else hauling out on the icebergs. Jökulsárlón provides them with a safe haven to rest and socialise, especially considering the waters of southeast Iceland are renowned for their population of orcas.